UC Berkeley 

International Islamophobia Studies Research Association

Islamophobia and Knowledge Production

Annual Conference

Call for Papers

May 5-7, 2023

University of California, Berkeley


The International Islamophobia Studies Research Association supports the dissemination of academic research and publicly engaged scholarship on Islamophobia. The association accomplishes this mission through academic fora that facilitates the transnational, multidirectional flow of knowledge across academia, policy and government, media, and global civil society. By engaging in knowledge mobilization activities—such as networking, disseminating, exchanging and supporting research-based knowledge, IISRA will provide the hub for academic leadership in the field of Islamophobia Studies.

The annual conference is inviting academics, independent scholars and community based researchers to submit abstracts on any and all areas of research focusing on Islamophobia. 

While research over the past few decades has highlighted the various ways discrimination, racism, and bigotry have become common occurrence in the lives of Muslims as a racialized and targeted group, the need for more systematic and persistent scholarship remains urgent.  In the context of the intensified levels of violence and cases of genocide directed at Muslims and the demonization of Islam as a “non-Western” religion, the the International Islamophobia Studies Research Association’s (IISRA) vision is to form the global architecture for the field of Islamophobia Studies. In the Islamic tradition, the Arabic acronym for this academic association refers to a nocturnal journey leading to knowledge and spiritual insight known as ‘Isra.’ As an interdisciplinary scholarly network, IISRA draws on this meaning in the development of a ‘global caravan’ dedicated to mobilizing academic knowledge that documents and challenges Islamophobia on a planetary scale.

The second annual conference will be an important step toward actualizing IISRA’s mission to support the dissemination of academic research and publicly engaged scholarship on Islamophobia through academic fora that will facilitate the transnational, multidirectional flow of knowledge across academia, policy and government, media, and global civil society. By engaging in knowledge mobilization activities—such as networking, disseminating, exchanging, and supporting research-based knowledge, IISRA provides the hub for academic leadership in the field of Islamophobia Studies.

The call for papers is an open invitation for all the co-producers of knowledge, resistance, and decolonial framing of the world to gather and discuss how to bring about the future horizons to which we all aspire.  We invite papers that cover any aspects of the challenge of Islamophobia in a variety of interdisciplinary and transnational contexts.

The conference seeks papers that examine how the Muslim subject is constructed in public discourses, the distinct periods (historical or contemporary), and the regional specificity of such framings. We encourage academics, research centers and organizations to submit fully developed panels that include a title for the panel, abstract for each paper and bio for the proposed participants.

Abstracts are limited to 300 words and a one paragraph (100 words) biography to be used for the program, if the paper is selected.

Submission Deadline: January 6, 2023

Response to Abstracts: February 15, 2023


Membership in the IISRA is a requirement for all accepted abstract as well as conference fees.  You can also become a member, pay the conference fees and attend the conference without presenting a paper.

See membership information on the following link: https://iisrassociation.org 


IISRA's Board

Hatem Bazian - President, USA

Salman Sayyid - Vice President, UK

Jasmin Zine - Vice President, Canada

Munir Jiwa- Secretary, USA

Saul Takahashi- Treasurer, Japan

Board Members at Large

Abdool Karim Vakil, UK

Amina Easaat-Das, UK

Rabab Abdul-Hadi, USA

Nadia Fadil, Belgium

Farid Hafez, Austria and USA

Elsadig Elsheikh, USA

International Islamophobia Studies Research Association (IISRA)

Inaugural conference

States of Islamophobia (Studies)

Istanbul-Turkey

July 14-16, 2022

https://irdp.submittable.com/submit/225879/cfp-states-of-islamophobia-studies


While research over the past few decades has highlighted the various ways discrimination, racism, and bigotry have become common occurrence in the lives of Muslims as a racialized and targeted group, the need for more systematic and persistent scholarship remains urgent.  In the context of the intensified levels of violence and cases of genocide directed at Muslims and the demonization of Islam as a “non-Western” religion, the the International Islamophobia Studies Research Association’s (IISRA) vision is to form the global architecture for the field of Islamophobia Studies. In the Islamic tradition, the Arabic acronym for this academic association refers to a nocturnal journey leading to knowledge and spiritual insight known as ‘Isra.’ As an interdisciplinary scholarly network, IISRA draws on this meaning in the development of a ‘global caravan’ dedicated to mobilizing academic knowledge that documents and challenges Islamophobia on a planetary scale.

The inaugural conference will be an important step toward actualizing IISRA’s mission to support the dissemination of academic research and publicly engaged scholarship on Islamophobia through academic fora that will facilitate the transnational, multidirectional flow of knowledge across academia, policy and government, media, and global civil society. By engaging in knowledge mobilization activities—such as networking, disseminating, exchanging, and supporting research-based knowledge, IISRA will provide the hub for academic leadership in the field of Islamophobia Studies.

The call for papers is an open invitation for all the co-producers of knowledge, resistance, and decolonial framing of the world to gather and discuss how to bring about the future horizons to which we all aspire.  We invite papers that take stock of the “States of Islamophobia Studies” in a variety of interdisciplinary and transnational contexts.

The conference seeks papers that examine how the Muslim subject is constructed in public discourses, the distinct periods (historical or contemporary), and the regional specificity of such framings.  We encourage the submission of fully-formed panels that can address the theme of the inaugural conference, either from one particular academic field or in an interdisciplinary framing.

Abstracts are limited to 300 words and a one paragraph (100 words) biography to be used for the program, if the paper is selected.

Abstracts are due by May. 31st, 2022

Response to abstracts by June 5th, 2022

Submit Abstract online


IISRA's Board

Hatem Bazian - President, USA

Salman Sayyid - Vice President, UK

Jasmin Zine - Vice President, Canada

Munir Jiwa- Secretary, USA

Saul Takahashi- Treasurer, Japan

Board Members at Large

Abdool Karim Vakil, UK

Amina Easaat-Das, UK  

Rabab Abdul-Hadi, USA

Nadia Fadil, Belgium   

Farid Hafez, Austria and USA 

Elsadig Elsheikh, USA 

Mattais Gardell, Sweden

Marwan Muhammed, France

Islamophobia Studies Center, Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project and the Islamophobia Studies Journal 

Invite you to submit paper abstracts


France’s “Separatism” Trope and the Colonial Present

8th Annual Paris Islamophobia Conference

December 9th, 2021

Using claims of fighting “Islamic Separatism” in the country, French President Emmanuel Macron instituted a number of draconian measures targeting Muslim communities in France, which included closing mosques and a number of Muslim charitable and civil society associations.  Taken together, the measures point to Muslims being accorded differentiated treatment under French laws and prima facie evidence of inferior citizenship status in the country.  Not only did the French state close Mosques and civil society organizations, but also undertook measures to “regulate” and directly interfere in the articulation of Islam, trilaterly in terms of its legal, theological and communal aspects.  “Islam has a problem” is the catch-all framing used by President Marcon to institute a set of measures uniquely “suited” to Muslims; as a racialized and differentiated religious community, and a distinct “inferriorized” class in France.

Indeed, France’s method of engagement with Islam and Muslims is neither new, nor an outcome of contemporary circumstances, difficult and complex as it maybe.  Governing, reforming and regulating Islam has been a French preoccupation since Napolean’s ill-fated Egyptian adventure in 1798, which was undertaken to threaten British colonial interest and trade routes to India.  Napoleon needed Islam as a foil for French imperial interests opposite the British, which was easily framed in a “civilizational and liberatory” mission to the Muslim world.  The idea of the Muslim and bad Muslim is not new, and Napolean himself introduced it when the French army ran into difficulty in military operations south of Cairo.  Today, Macron’s campaign in the name of “separatism” inside the country qualifies as an attempt at a distraction for French current Military involvement in the Francophone zone as well as the domestic failure of the neoliberal economic project.  Racism and Islamophobia are introduced as a distraction and diversion from asking the critical questions related to economics and foreign policies while preventing and disrupting real racial and class solidarity.

France’s colonial present produces and constantly reintroduces the epistemological foundation of separatism; the type that is structured around racializing Islam and Muslims, positing the civilized-uncivilized, rational-irrational, modern-traditional, violent-peaceful, liberal-illiberal and inclusion-execlusion binaries.  Separatism is what Muslims and non-White immigrants experience daily in France’s colonial present, which is internally and externally manifested.  The 8th annual conference invites papers to interrogate the unique French brand of Islamophobia and the persistent intrusion into Muslims’ religious life, space and communal expressions through the use of an extreme version of secularism.  Papers may take a historical examination of France’s colonial past and the violent entanglements in Muslim majority states that continue to shape relations in the current period.  Additionally, papers may take on the contemporary developments in France and provide analysis based on academic or scholarly specialization or utilize a comparative with other regions i.e. Belgium, Canada, Netherlands, UK or USA.


Note:

Abstracts are limited to 300 words, a one paragraph (100 words) biography to be used for the program, if the paper is selected and a photo for the website promotions.

Abstracts are due by November 6, 2021

Response to abstracts by November 15, 2021

Final program released by December 1st, 2021

Submit Abstract online


Appel à communications

Islamophobie et sciences sociales :

Questions contemporaines


Paris, France

Monday, December 16th


 6èmeédition du colloque annuel « Islamophobie en contexte français »

Organisateurs :

International Islamophobia Studies Association

Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project

University of California, Berkeley

Islamophobia Studies Center

&

Centre for Ethnicity and Racism Studies

University of Leeds, UK

&

Islamophobia Studies Journal

&

ReOrient Journal

 Quoique la « question musulmane » soit durablement installée au cœur de l’espace public (Geisser 2003 ; Deltombe 2007 ; Hajjat et Mohammed 2013), peu de travaux s’attachent au sein du champ académique français à la discussion de l’islamophobie contemporaine ; comme le rappelle ainsi Marwan Mohammed en introduction au numéro consacré à la question par la revue Sociologie, l’espace universitaire de langue française se caractérise « tant par la rareté des publications sur l’islamophobie que par l’absence de programme ou d’espace de recherche dédiés» (Mohammed 2014). Pour autant, si le terme « islamophobie » lui-même demeure ainsi diversement accepté au sein du débat savant en France (Lebourg 2011 ; Asal 2014), l’état de la problématique est tout autre au sein du monde académique anglophone. En effet, tant aux États-Unis qu’au Royaume-Uni, de nombreux travaux (Klug 2012) issus de traditions disciplinaires et intellectuelles variées (Hafez 2018) s’attachent ainsi ainsi à la genèse (Bazian 2017) et à la conceptualisation (Sayyid 2014) de l’islamophobie contemporaine ; plus avant, plusieurs programmes de recherche collectifs ont ainsi vu le jour, avec comme point d’orgue la conférence annuelle International Islamophobia Studies[1]à l’Université de Californie à Berkeley. 

Une première question émerge ainsi : qu’est-ce qui explique une telle différence de réception et de traitement d’un espace académique à l’autre ? Tout en se gardant de l’explication culturaliste, il s’agit d’interroger alors les sens et enjeux de cette non-réception relative dans le contexte académique français. Plus avant, à l’heure de la lutte contre la « radicalisation » (Nilsson 2018), on peut ainsi mettre en regard la controverse touchant à la notion d’islamophobie au sein du champ universitaire avec l’importante mobilisation[2]des sciences sociales en vue de l’établissement de « signes », de « degrés » et de « profils » pour le repérage et la neutralisation de formes politico-religieuses réputées trop affirmées (Guibet-Lafaye 2017 ; Sakhi 2019). En 2016, un rapport intitulé « Face aux attentats : un an de mobilisation au CNRS » indiquait ainsi que : « la volonté de faire dialoguer les chercheur.e.s de diverses disciplines, les décideurs et décideuses publics, les acteurs et actrices du renseignement, de la sécurité, de la justice et de l'éducation, s'est amplifiée en 2016Cela se traduit aujourd'hui par la réalisation de projets associant directement recherche et acteurs ou actrices de terrain (par exemple entre policier.e.s et archéologues autour du trafic d'antiquités), et par la mise en œuvre de collaborations durables entre le CNRS et des ministères (ministère de l'Intérieur, ministère de la Justice, ministère en charge des familles…), des collectivités et des administrations qui ont aussi répondu à l'appel du CNRS (comme par exemple la direction du renseignement militaire). Une école thématique « Radicalisations » et des ateliers organisés au siège du CNRS sur la « Genèse des radicalisations », « Les carrières de la terreur », « L'impact des attentats » ont déjà permis aux chercheur.e.s qui ont répondu à l'appel de se rencontrer et de se constituer en nouvelle communauté scientifique incontournable sur les questions de sécurité » (CNRS 2016). Dès lors, partant du rapport des sciences sociales aux politiques de lutte contre « radicalisation » (Esmili 2018), il s’agit d’interroger la constitution savante du « problème musulman », dans une perspective pouvant être celle de la sociologie de la science (Bourdieu 1976).

Mais il s’agit également d’envisager ce dont l’islamophobie est le nom, et le colloque s’évertuera ainsi à faire place aux différentes problématisations du concept : depuis la continuité historique reliant l’islamophobie au rejet des populations issues de l’immigration (Deltombe op.cit) à la comparaison avec d’autres formes de racisme (2013; Prasad 2013; Ramm 2009; Saeed 2007; Schiffer et Wagner 2011; Shumsky 2004; Ureta et Profanter 2011) et, en particulier à l’antisémitisme (Buntzl 2005 ; Ghiles-Meilhac 2015), passant par l’approche viala discrimination et le « préjudice » à l’égard des populations musulmanes (Ünal 2016), la perspective décoloniale (Grosfoguel 2012 ; Bazian op.cit, Sayyid 2014) et le rapport aux dispositifs contemporains de gouvernementalité (Kundnani 2012, Kumar 2015, Massoumi, Mills et Miller 2017).

Ce colloque entend ainsi questionner aussi bien l’expérience de l’islamophobie ordinaire en France et ailleurs que la politique singulière qui s’y donne à voir : l’islamophobie est-elle alors un « simple » racisme ? Quels usages scientifiques peuvent-ils être fait de la notion ? Comment la mesurer ? Quels rapports entretient-elle avec les formes contemporaines de souveraineté étatique ? Comment la problématique de l’islamophobie est-elle politisée dans le champ militant ? 

Il s’agit ainsi d’établir un état de la littérature scientifique quant à la problématique de l’islamophobie, tout en mettant en rapport des chercheurs et chercheuses inscrivant leur travail dans les différentes disciplines des sciences humaines et sociales (sociologie, histoire, philosophie, linguistique, anthropologie, science politique etc.). On visera en effet, tout au long du colloque, à envisager les modalités possibles pour la constitution d’un programme de recherche scientifique et collective (Lakatos 1994) dédié à la question de l’islamophobie en France. Partant de là, les propositions de communication pourront s’inscrire dans les axes suivants :

Axe 1 : Sciences sociales, islam et islamophobie : état des lieux

Ce premier axe vise donc à revenir sur les débats épistémologiques et méthodologiques quant à la notion d’islamophobie en sciences sociales. Il s’agit d’établir ainsi un état des lieux de la recherche contemporaine qui s’y attache, tout en portant une attention particulière à la sociologie du sous-champ scientifique dédié aux populations et pratiques musulmanes. Comment les sciences sociales perçoivent-elles l’islam dans le contexte du champ académique français ? En conséquence, qu’est-ce qui alors indiquée par la controverse scientifique autour de la notion d’islamophobie ? 

Axe 2 : L’islamophobie comme expérience du contemporain ? Genre, classe et islamophobie

 Cet axe vise à revenir sur la perception et la qualification de l’islamophobie dans l’expérience des sujets qui en font l’objet. Quels mots sont ainsi utilisés dans la narration ordinaire de l’islamophobie ? Comment celle-ci est-elle dénoncée ? S’agit-il d’une expérience en tout point similaire à celle du racisme (Eberhard, 2010) ? On propose alors d’interroger l’expérience de l’islamophobie en lien avec différentes scènes sociales (école, travail, hôpital, institutions publiques, prison etc.). Nous sollicitons en particulier des communications qui, partant d’enquêtes empiriques, mettent en lien l’islamophobie avec la position sociale et le genre de ceux qui en sont les sujets. 

Axe 3 : Racisme(s), racialisation et islamophobie

Un troisième axe d’analyse pourra interroger la superposition du concept d’islamophobie à celui de racisme (Balibar, 2005) : l’islamophobie est-elle une forme de « racisme culturel » (Fanon 2011) ou procède-t-elle depuis la racialisation des sujets musulmans ou perçus comme tel (Mohammed 2015) ? La perspective comparative est ainsi encouragée, tant à l’égard des différentes formes de racisme (négrophobie, racisme anti-maghrébin, antisémitisme etc.) que vis-à-vis d’autres types de représentations et pratiques hostiles à l’égard de groupes sociaux déterminés (sexisme, homophobie, rejet des « migrants » etc.), en vue d’identifier les ressorts spécifiques du récit islamophobe. On pourra également s’intéresser ici à « l’industrie de l’islamophobie » (Bazian et Leung 2014), soit les différents groupes d’intérêt, médias et organisations politiques liés à la promotion et à la diffusion de thèmes islamophobes dans le débat public. 

Axe 4 : Politique intérieure, politique extérieure : un trait d’union islamophobe ?

 Cet axe est proposé dans l’objectif de mettre en lien la constitution de la figure de l’ennemi musulman « parmi nous » (Arendt1973 [1951]) aux différentes interventions militaires de la France dans le monde. On s’attachera ainsi à resituer la question de l’islamophobie au cours de la séquence historique où la « guerre contre la terreur » est un paradigme à la fois durable et incontournable de l’action étatique (Agamben 2005 ; Kundnani 2017 ; Hass 2019). 

Axe 5 : Un État islamophobe ? Ordre séculier et gouvernement des fidèles à l’heure de la « radicalisation »

 Enfin, à l’heure où la lutte et la prévention de la « radicalisation » sont investies par l’ensemble des instances de l’État, ce dernier axe propose de réinscrire la politique islamophobe dans la trame des configurations de l’ordre séculier et de la pratique religieuse (Asad 2003). En effet, au-delà sa forme juridique (loi sur les signes ostentatoires à l’école de 2004, loi d’interdiction de la Burqa de 2010, amendement visant à l’exclusion des mamans d’élèves voilées des sorties pédagogiques de 2019), il s’agit d’interroger le rapport d’une pastorale étatique (Foucault 2004) aux formes de vie (Wittgenstein 2004 [1953] ; Laugier et Ferrarese 2015 ; Jaeggi 2018) religieuses qui naissent en ces plis. On pourra s’intéresser aux formes d’historicisation de l’islamophobie, en France et au-delà, potentiellement au cours la période coloniale et/ou au sein même des pays « à majorité musulmane » (Bayraklı et Hafez 2018). 

Ces axes ont valeur indicative, il est donc tout à fait possible de proposer des communications construites autour d’autres formes de problématisation. Par ailleurs, une communication peut être transversale à plusieurs axes.

Modalités de soumission 

Les propositions de communication sont attendues pour le 15 septembre 2019 et son à envoyer sur le lien suivant :

https://irdp.submittable.com/submit/143189/islamophobia-and-social-sciences-contemporary-issues-paris-6th-annual-islamophob

Elles comprendront :

1)  Un abstract de 300 mots.

2) Une biographie de 100 mots et une photo en haute résolution utilisées pour le programme et la promotion de la conférence en cas d’acceptation de la proposition. 

Bibliographie indicative

Agamben Giorgio. 2005. État d'exception Homo sacer, II, 1, Paris, Seuil

Arendt Hannah. 1973 [1951]. Sur l’antisémitisme, Paris, Calman-Lévy

Asad Talal. 2003. Formations of the secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity, Stanford University Press

Asal, Houda. 2014. Islamophobie : la fabrique d'un nouveau concept. État des lieux de la recherche, Sociologie, vol. 5(1), 13-29

Balibar Etienne. 2005 ? La construction du racisme, Actuel Marx, vol. 38, no. 2, p. 11-28.

Bayraklı Enes, Hafez Farid. 2018. Islamophobia in Muslim Majority Societies, New York, 2018

Bazian Hatem, Leung Maxwell. 2014. Editorial Statement. Islamophobia Studies Journal, Spring 2014, Volume 2, Issue 1

Bazian Hatem. 2017. Annotations on Race, Colonialism, Islamophobia, Islam and Palestine, Amsterdam, Amrit Publishers

Bourdieu Pierre. 1976. Le champ scientifique, Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales. Vol. 2, n°2-3, pp. 88-104

Bunzl Matti. 2007. Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia. Hatreds Old and New in Europe. Chicago:Chicago University Press.

Centre national de la recherche scientifique. 2016. Face aux attentats : un an de mobilisation au CNRS

Chicago University Press

Deltombe Thomas. 2007. L’islam imaginaire. La construction médiatique de l’islamophobie en France (1975-2005), Paris, La Découverte

Eberhard Mireille. 2010. De l’expérience du racisme à sa reconnaissance comme discrimination. Stratégies discursives et conflits d’interprétation, Sociologie, vol. 1, n° 4.

Esmili Hamza. 2018. Islamophobie et sciences sociales, les contours d’une raison d’État, rapport 2018 du Collectif contre l’islamophobie en France.

Fanon Frantz. 2011, Racisme et Culturein Oeuvres, Paris, La Découverte

Ferrarese, Estelle, LaugierSandra. Politique des formes de vie, Raisons politiques, vol. 57, no. 1, 2015, pp. 5-12

Foucault Michel. 2004. Sécurité, territoire, population. Cours au Collège de France (1977-1978), Paris, Hautes Études

Geisser Vincent. 2003. La nouvelle islamophobie, Paris, La Découverte

Grosfoguel Ramon. 2012. The Multiple Faces of Islamophobia, Islamophobia Studies Journal 1 (1): 9–33

Guibet-Lafaye Caroline, et Ami-Jacques Rapin. 2017. La « radicalisation ». Individualisation et dépolitisation d’une notion, Politiques de communication, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 127-154

Hafez Farid. 2018. Schools of Thought in Islamophobia Studies: Prejudice, Racism, and Decoloniality, Islamophobia Studies Journal , Vol. 4, N°2, pp. 210-225

Hajjat Abdelali, Mohammed Marwan. 2013. Islamophobie. Comment les élites françaises fabriquent le problème musulman, Paris, Broché

Jaeggi Rahel. 2018. Critique of Forms of Life. Cambridge, Harvard University Press

Kallis Aristotle. 2013. Breaking Taboos and Mainstreaming the Extreme. The Debates on Restricting Islamic Symbols in Contemporary Europe, in Right-Wing Populism in Europe. Politics and Discourse, edited by R. Wodak, M. Khosravinik, and B. Mral, 55–70. London, Bloomsbury

Klug Brian. 2012. Islamophobia: A Concept Comes of Age,Ethnicités 12 (5): 665–81.

Kumar Deepa. 2015. Race, ideology and empire, Dialect Anthropology, 39:121-128

Kundnani Arun. 2014. The Muslims are Coming! Islamophobia, Extremism, and the Domestic War on Terror, New York, Verso Books

Kundnani Arun. 2017. Islamophobia as Ideology of US Empire in Massoumi Narzanin, Mills Tom, Miller David (eds). 2017. What is Islamophobia? Racism, Social Movements and the State, Pluto Press

Lebourg Nicolas. 2011. La diffusion des péjorations communautaires après 1945: Les nouvelles altérophobies. Revue d'éthique et de théologie morale, 267(4), 35-58

Massoumi Narzanin, Mills Tom, MillerDavid (eds). 2017. What is Islamophobia? Racism, Social Movements and the State, Pluto Press

Mohammed Marwan. 2014. Un nouveau champ de recherche. Sociologie, 2014/1 (Vol. 5)

Mohammed Marwan. 2015. La transversalité politique de l’islamophobie : analyse de quelques ressorts historiques et idéologiques. Confluences Méditerranée, 95(4), 131-142

Nilsson Per-Erik. 2018. Open source Jihad, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press

Prasad Nivedita. 2013. Feminisms. The Hegemonic Power of Feminist Actors in the Discourse on Immigration Policiesin Prospects of Asian Migration. Transformation of Gender and Labour Relation, edited by S. Poma Poma and K. Pühl, 90–95. Berlin: Rosa-Luxemburg-Stiftung.

Saeed Amir 2007. Media, Racism and Islamophobia: The Representation of Islam and Muslims in the Media, Sociology CompassVol.1 (2): 443–62.

Sakhi Montassir. 2018. ‪Terrorisme et radicalisation: Une anthropologie de l’exception politique, Journal des anthropologues, 154-155(3), 161-18

Sayyid Salman. 2014. Recalling the Caliphate. Decolinization and World Order. London: C. Hurst & Co. Publishers.

Schiffer Sabine, Wagner Constentin. 2011. Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia—New Enemies, Old Patterns,Race & Class52 (3): 77–84.

Shumsky Dmiti. 2004. Post-Zionist Orientalism? Orientalist Discourse and Islamophobia among the Russian-Speaking Intelligentsia in Israel, Social Identities10 (1): 83–99

Unal Fatih. 2016. Islamophobia & Anti-Semitism: Comparing the Social Psychological Underpinnings of Anti-Semitic and Anti-Muslim Beliefs in Contemporary Germany, Islamophobia Studies Journal3 (2): 35–55.

Ureta Ivan, Profanter Annemarie. 2011. Public Discourse and the Raising of Islamophobia: The Swiss Case in Media, Migration and Public Opinion: Myths, Prejudices and the Challengeof Attaining Mutual Understanding between Europe and North Africa, edited by I. Ureta, 239–63. New York: Peter Lang

Wittgenstein Ludwig. 2004 [1953]. Recherches Philosophiques, Paris, Gallimard


[1]Débuté en 2009, ce cycle de conférences en est ainsi à sa dixième édition.
https://www.crg.berkeley.edu/events/the-10th-annual-international-islamophobia-conference/(consulté le 7 juin 2019)

[2]« La création de ce Conseil scientifique s’inscrit dans la politique que mène la ministre dans le cadre du Plan gouvernemental d’action contre la radicalisation et le terrorisme (Part), initié au lendemain des attentats de janvier 2015. Cette mobilisation repose sur 5 axes : la prévention, le repérage et le signalement, le suivi des jeunes en voie de radicalisation scolarisés, la formation et la recherche.

[…] Composé à moitié de chercheurs issus de différentes disciplines des sciences sociales et reconnus sur ces questions et de représentants d’instances décisionnelles, ce conseil se réunira en assemblée plénière une fois par trimestre, en lien avec l’INHESJ (Institut national des hautes études sur la sécurité et la justice). Sa première mission est de travailler sur les phénomènes de radicalisation religieuse en France, ses conséquences sur la société française et les moyens d’en protéger les populations. Il va contribuer à créer une dynamique et une culture commune entre la recherche et l’action publique. […] Les sciences humaines et sociales ont un rôle fondamental à jouer au service d’une action publique efficace et, en retour, une meilleure connaissance de cette dernière va contribuer à nourrir les réflexions scientifiques ».

http://www.najat-vallaud-belkacem.com/2017/02/08/installation-du-conseil-scientifique-sur-les-processus-de-radicalisation/(consulté le 7 juin 2019)

IRDP